Socrates: Former Brazil World Cup Captain Dies



Socrates in full flow

Socrates in full flow

The former Brazil World Cup captain has passed away in hospital in Sao Paolo, the South American football star became a doctor after he retired and was revered by many. Ronaldo and Rivaldo were two of Brazilian football legends who acknowledged his death, he was also their predecessor making the same if not bigger impact than the two younger men.

Food poisoning

Socrates has been admitted into the Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital in Sao Paolo from late last week after falling to food poisoning. This developed into septic shock of the intestine leaving the great footballer on a life-support machine.

Since August this was the third time Socrates had been admitted into hospital previously spending nine days there because of a digestive haemorrhage which was believed to be caused by over indulging in alcohol.

Then in September he stayed in hospital for 17 days due to liver trouble for which he had been recommended transplant. These were clear signs of a man afflicted with declining health and a unfortunate end to what was an individual who had two exceptional careers, he not only made an impact on the field he also did his part has a doctor.

Many big named football stars have spoken out after hearing of his death none bigger than Zico, who was a team-mate at the 1982 World Cup. Later in his life many referred to him as Dr Socrates, the original Socrates had died many years ago after being forced to drink hemlock and the modern version looked charmingly like an Athenian philosopher.

Weirdly his top performances in the 1982 World Cup provoked one of the greatest lines in football, ‘And Socrates scores a goal that sums up the philosophy of Brazilian football’. The only shame has been that he will not be present when the World Cup returns to his homeland in 2014.

World Cup in 2014

The World Cup in 2014 is much anticipated, as there is the prospect of some top football played in the region of the world known for its technical ability, but also where fans love the game and feel strongly about the success of their nation.

“Socrates was an intelligent man, he had great class. He was an objector, he wanted to know everything, why he couldn’t smoke on the team bus, why we had to be in retreat on the Saturday nights before games. He was an intelligent person who was interested in politics, though he smoked and drank a bit too much,” said Giancarlo De Sista, the Brazilian’s former coach at Fiorentina.

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