Travel Industry Recovery Still Slow as Airport Passengers Decrease



BAA reports a decrease in airline passengers at all of their six managed airports.

BAA reports a decrease in airline passengers at all of their six managed airports.

The travel industry has been struggling in this economy. Quite a few travel planning companies have completely closed down their businesses just this summer leaving passengers stranded abroad or unable to go on their planned vacations. It seems that relief for this sector is still not in sight as new reports show there has been a decrease in passengers at major airports.

BAA, an airport operator of six major airports, reported that passenger numbers fell in one year’s time by 3.2 per cent. The reporting period covered September 2009 to August 2010. Glasgow is the worst affected of all airports which reported a 9.9 per cent decrease. Aberdeen was right behind Glasgow at 8 per cent. Heathrow was the airport showing the smallest decrease in passengers reporting a drop of only 0.8 per cent.

Stansted reported a decrease of 7.4 per cent, Southampton 3.2 per cent, and Edinburgh’s decrease in passengers was 3.6 per cent.

In comparing August 2010 with the same month last year, BAA reported a drop of 0.8 per cent. The total number of passengers in August amounted to 10.6 million. This was a total of all six airports combined that BAA manages.

A BAA spokesman said: “BAA has seen a significant rise in confidence this year and with Heathrow enjoying its busiest ever August, passengers across all airports fell only very slightly.

“It’s been an exceptional 12 months with the ash crisis but we’ve invested in our airports and our people and we’re now delivering a better customer experience.

“Also of importance is that fact that cargo volumes are now above pre-recession levels, which is a great indicator of improved trade and of new confidence in the economy.

“Heathrow is the UK’s biggest trading port and clearly this has all manner of benefits for partner airports in Scotland and for the wider UK economy.”

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