Economy: Poll Shows Britons Gloomy, Agree with Tories



Cameron-1

Cameron-1

In the latest Reuters/Ipsos MORI poll, figures show that UK citizens remain gloomy about the prospect of things “getting better” financially, but the Conservative Party overall is perceived to have the best-suited policies to run the country during economic downturn.

Poll results

While Labour continued to be the most popular political party, its support in the polls was at its lowest level since last October. Ed Miliband, Labour leader, had his worst personal ratings since he took office last September. Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg has a divisive impact on his supporters, 50% of whom were satisfied while 43% were not.

Conservatives have proved themselves resilient, as support for Conservatives among those certain to vote was 35%, not showing a slip from last month. Labour, on the other hand, was down 3 points to 37%, and the Lib Dems came in at just 13%. Lib Dems have suffered a 10 point loss in support polls since the last election.

While there is no new election scheduled until 2015, the Conservatives Liberal Democrats of the coalition government will be having their own party conferences in the coming weeks. Opinon polls are thought to play an important role in measuring the national mood before announcing any drastic measures at the annual conferences.

Gloomy outlooks

The coalition government is set to back an austerity programme in an effort to cut government spending by as much as 20% in some departments. Among the parties in the coalition, 33% of those polled answered that they felt Conservatives had the best economic policies for this economic climate, while just 23% felt so about Lib Dems.

In addition, 52% had a gloomy outlook on the economy, answering that they predict the UK’s economic condition will worsen in the next year. Only 20% felt that there would be any improvement.

The poll from Reuters/Ipsos MORI included a sample set of 1,008 adults over the age of 18, across all of the UK.

Leave your comment

  • (not published)