BAE Systems Announces Possible Job Cuts of 740 from Workforce



BAE Systems has announced job cuts due to expected workload reduction and budget cuts to the defence.

BAE Systems has announced job cuts due to expected workload reduction and budget cuts to the defence.

The BAE’s Military Air Solutions Division has announced that they will be cutting jobs due to the proposed Government budget cuts to the country’s defence budget. Union officials warned that the jobs announced to be cut could be but a small amount compared to what is to come, calling it the “tip of the iceberg”. The BAE Systems job cuts will deplete 740 UK jobs.

A BAE spokesman, Kevin Taylor, managing director of BAE’s Military Air Solutions Division said job losses would be primarily in the manufacturing, engineering, and support staff areas.

“These potential job losses result from the impact of the changes in the defence programme announced in December 2009, together with other workload changes,” he said. “We appreciate this is difficult news and we are committed to working with employees and their representatives to explore ways of mitigating the potential job losses.”

Hugh Scullion, general secretary of the Union at BAE, the Confederation of Shipbuilding and Engineering Unions, said: “The unions are shocked at the scale of these losses and will be demanding an explanation from BAE.”

“With the forthcoming defence review these cuts may be the tip of the iceberg but knee-jerk reactions from employers could make things even worse.

“Cuts are being demanded before the shape of the defence industry has been decided. The defence industry will suffer more than necessary, if employers make poor judgment calls.”

The job cuts will be due to the retirement of the Nimrod R-1, and a reduction in workload related to the Tornado, Harrier and Hawk programs. There is also a reduction in workload due to a decrease in orders from other companies such as Spirit Aerostructures. BAE Systems employs approximately 40,000 workers in the UK and more than 100,000 total workers world-wide.

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