Superman no longer American



Superman

Superman

In its 900th issue, Action Comics’ Superman will renounce his U.S citizenship, saying “I’m tired of having my actions construed as instruments of U.S. policy.”

Superman questions his longtime motto: “Truth, justice and the American way.” claiming “it’s not enough anymore.”

This landmark issue is sparking loads of controversy, but Superman’s creators defended the decision. Created in 1938 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, Superman has always been depicted as a devoted American warrior fighting evil. However, as of Thursday, the United States can no longer claim him as their own.

DC Comic’s co-publishers, Jim Lee and Dan DiDio said “Superman is a visitor from a distant planet who has long embraced American values. As a character and an icon, he embodies the best of the American way. In a short story in ACTION COMICS 900, Superman announces his intention to put a global focus on his never ending battle, but he remains, as always, committed to his adopted home and his roots as a Kansas farm boy from Smallville.”

Some think this move insults America. Angie Meyer, a Hollywood publicist and GOP activist commented, “Besides being riddled with a blatant lack of patriotism, and respect for our country, Superman’s current creators are belittling the United States as a whole. By denouncing his citizenship, Superman becomes an eerie metaphor for the current economic and power status the country holds worldwide,”

Others celebrate the decision. Wired blogger Scott Thill said, “Superman has always been bigger than the United States. In an age rife with immigration paranoia, it’s refreshing to see an alien refugee tell the United States that it’s as important to him as any other country on Earth — which, in turn, is as important to Superman as any other planet in the multiverse.”

He continued on, “The genius of Superman is that he belongs to everyone, for the dual purposes of peace and protection.”

What do you think of DC Comic’s decision?

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